Cleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions

Unexploded military ordnance and toxic chemicals, some dating back to World War I, are a worldwide concern, especially at closed military bases that will be redeveloped for housing or civilian use. In Europe and Asia, many munitions sites are former battlegrounds; in Russia and its former territories, sites are used for storage and waste disposal. Experts estimate that the United States alone could spend between $50 and 250 billion dollars to cleanup these sites, many of which are in high-population density, residential areas. You might live near one such site right now. This book gives detailed instructions for cleaning up military ordnance sites, and lists of explosives, chemical warfare materials and breakdown products that the soil and groundwater must be tested for. Also included are archival studies; remote sensing techniques; geophysical techniques; safety issues; a chemical weapons, explosives and ordnance primer; known and unknown range lists; and a case study of documents written for cleaning up one of the worst examples yet: Spring Valley in the District of Columbia. It disproves myths, common misconceptions and lies, and explains what, how, and where to look for munitions and their residual contamination. * Author is an award winning and world-renowned expert in weapons of mass destruction. * Meets the needs of explosive and ordnance demolition personnel, as well as environmental scientists, insurance agents, and building contractors. * Includes the primary documents written (by the author) for the cleanup of one of the worst sites in the United States (Spring Valley, District of Columbia). * Subject of the book is of worldwide concern with former battlegrounds in Europe and Asia, as well as storage and waste disposal sites in Russia and former Soviet territories. * The only text available with clear and complete instructions on proper cleanup of military ordnance sites including a detailed list of explosives, chemical warfare material and breakdown products.

Produk Detail:

  • Author : Richard Albright
  • Publisher : William Andrew
  • Pages : 330 pages
  • ISBN : 0080947360
  • Rating : 4/5 from 21 reviews
CLICK HERE TO GET THIS BOOKCleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions

Cleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions

Cleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions
  • Author : Richard Albright
  • Publisher : William Andrew
  • Release : 15 January 2013
GET THIS BOOKCleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions

Unexploded military ordnance and toxic chemicals, some dating back to World War I, are a worldwide concern, especially at closed military bases that will be redeveloped for housing or civilian use. In Europe and Asia, many munitions sites are former battlegrounds; in Russia and its former territories, sites are used for storage and waste disposal. Experts estimate that the United States alone could spend between $50 and 250 billion dollars to cleanup these sites, many of which are in high-population density, residential

Cleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions

Cleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions
  • Author : Richard Albright
  • Publisher : William Andrew
  • Release : 02 December 2011
GET THIS BOOKCleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions

Unexploded military ordnance and toxic chemicals, some dating back to the two World Wars, are a global concern, especially when former military bases are redeveloped for housing or other civilian uses. Internationally, there are the added challenges of cleanup of battlegrounds and minefields. Experts estimate that the United States alone could spend between $50–250 billion to clean up these sites, many of which are in areas of high population density, where the demand for land for development is high. This book

Cleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions

Cleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions
  • Author : Richard Albright
  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release : 04 July 2008
GET THIS BOOKCleanup of Chemical and Explosive Munitions

Unexploded military ordnance and toxic chemicals, some dating back to World War I, are a worldwide concern, especially at closed military bases that will be redeveloped for housing or civilian use. In Europe and Asia, many munitions sites are former battlegrounds; in Russia and its former territories, sites are used for storage and waste disposal. Experts estimate that the United States alone could spend between $50 and 250 billion dollars to cleanup these sites, many of which are in high-population density, residential

Chemical Weapons Destruction and Explosive Waste

Chemical Weapons Destruction and Explosive Waste
  • Author : Robert Noyes
  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release : 31 December 1996
GET THIS BOOKChemical Weapons Destruction and Explosive Waste

Some of the more difficult environmental problems facing the Department of Defense (DOD) include (1) chemical weapons destruction, (2) explosive waste remediation, and (3) unexploded ordnance clearance and extraction. It is conceivable that $50 to $100 billion will be spent by DOD for these three programs, offering unusual opportunities for environmental engineering and related firms. Military installations are similar to small cities in terms of population, industrial activities, and some types of contaminated sites. However, some cover an area larger than a small state. DOD

Review and Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons

Review and Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons
  • Author : National Research Council,Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences,Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems,Committee on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons
  • Publisher : National Academies Press
  • Release : 24 December 1999
GET THIS BOOKReview and Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons

This report examines seven disposal technologies being considered by the U.S. government as alternative methods to the process of incineration for destroying mortars, rockets, land mines, and other weapons that contain chemical warfare agents, such as mustard gas. These weapons are considered especially dangerous because they contain both chemical warfare agent and explosive materials in an assembled package that must be disassembled for destruction. The study identifies the strengths and weaknesses and advantages and disadvantages of each technology and

Remediation of Buried Chemical Warfare Materiel

Remediation of Buried Chemical Warfare Materiel
  • Author : National Research Council,Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences,Board on Army Science and Technology,Committee on Review of the Conduct of Operations for Remediation of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel from Burial Sites
  • Publisher : National Academies Press
  • Release : 21 August 2012
GET THIS BOOKRemediation of Buried Chemical Warfare Materiel

As the result of disposal practices from the early to mid-twentieth century, approximately 250 sites in 40 states, the District of Columbia, and 3 territories are known or suspected to have buried chemical warfare materiel (CWM). Much of this CWM is likely to occur in the form of small finds that necessitate the continuation of the Army's capability to transport treatment systems to disposal locations for destruction. Of greatest concern for the future are sites in residential areas and large sites on legacy

Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel

Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel
  • Author : National Research Council,Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences,Board on Army Science and Technology,Committee on Review and Evaluation of International Technologies for the Destruction of Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel
  • Publisher : National Academies Press
  • Release : 02 November 2006
GET THIS BOOKReview of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel

The Chemical Weapons Convention requires, among other things, that the signatories to the convention--which includes the United States--destroy by April 29, 2007, or as soon possible thereafter, any chemical warfare materiel that has been recovered from sites where it has been buried once discovered. For several years the United States and several other countries have been developing and using technologies to dispose of this non-stockpile materiel. To determine whether international efforts have resulted in technologies that would benefit the U.S. program,

Handbook of Toxicology of Chemical Warfare Agents

Handbook of Toxicology of Chemical Warfare Agents
  • Author : Ramesh C. Gupta
  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Release : 02 April 2009
GET THIS BOOKHandbook of Toxicology of Chemical Warfare Agents

This groundbreaking book covers every aspect of deadly toxic chemicals used as weapons of mass destruction and employed in conflicts, warfare and terrorism. Including findings from experimental as well as clinical studies, this one-of-a-kind handbook is prepared in a very user- friendly format that can easily be followed by students, teachers and researchers, as well as lay people. Stand-alone chapters on individual chemicals and major topics allow the reader to easily access required information without searching through the entire book.

Alternatives for the Demilitarization of Conventional Munitions

Alternatives for the Demilitarization of Conventional Munitions
  • Author : National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences,Board on Army Science and Technology,Committee on Alternatives for the Demilitarization of Conventional Munitions
  • Publisher : National Academies Press
  • Release : 11 January 2019
GET THIS BOOKAlternatives for the Demilitarization of Conventional Munitions

The U.S. military has a stockpile of approximately 400,000 tons of excess, obsolete, or unserviceable munitions. About 60,000 tons are added to the stockpile each year. Munitions include projectiles, bombs, rockets, landmines, and missiles. Open burning/open detonation (OB/OD) of these munitions has been a common disposal practice for decades, although it has decreased significantly since 2011. OB/OD is relatively quick, procedurally straightforward, and inexpensive. However, the downside of OB and OD is that they release contaminants from the operation

Dew of Death

Dew of Death
  • Author : Joel A. Vilensky
  • Publisher : Indiana University Press
  • Release : 07 September 2005
GET THIS BOOKDew of Death

"Dr. Vilensky raises important concerns regarding the threats posed by lewisite and other weapons of mass destruction. As he describes, non-proliferation programs are a vital component in the War on Terror." -- Richard G. Lugar, United States Senator "Joel Vilensky's book is a detailed and immensely useful account of the development and history of one of the major chemical weapons.... We will always know how to make lewisite, the 'Dew of Death,' but that does not mean that we