Evolutionary Criminology

In our attempts to understand crime, researchers typically focus on proximate factors such as the psychology of offenders, their developmental history, and the social structure in which they are embedded. While these factors are important, they don't tell the whole story. Evolutionary Criminology: Towards a Comprehensive Explanation of Crime explores how evolutionary biology adds to our understanding of why crime is committed, by whom, and our response to norm violations. This understanding is important both for a better understanding of what precipitates crime and to guide approaches for effectively managing criminal behavior. This book is divided into three parts. Part I reviews evolutionary biology concepts important for understanding human behavior, including crime. Part II focuses on theoretical approaches to explaining crime, including the evolution of cooperation, and the evolutionary history and function of violent crime, drug use, property offending, and white collar crime. The developmental origins of criminal behavior are described to account for the increase in offending during adolescence and early adulthood as well as to explain why some offenders are more likely to desist than others. Proximal causes of crime are examined, as well as cultural and structural processes influencing crime. Part III considers human motivation to punish norm violators and what this means for the development of a criminal justice system. This section also considers how an evolutionary approach contributes to our understanding of crime prevention and reduction. The section closes with an evolutionary approach to understanding offender rehabilitation and reintegration. Reviews how evolutionary findings improve our understanding of crime and punishment Examines motivations to offend, and to punish norm violators Articulates evolutionary explanations for adolescent crime increase Identifies how this knowledge can aid in crime prevention and reduction, and in offender rehabilitation

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  • Author : Russil Durrant
  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Pages : 348 pages
  • ISBN : 0123984939
  • Rating : 4/5 from 21 reviews
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Evolutionary Criminology

Evolutionary Criminology
  • Author : Russil Durrant,Tony Ward
  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Release : 12 March 2015
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In our attempts to understand crime, researchers typically focus on proximate factors such as the psychology of offenders, their developmental history, and the social structure in which they are embedded. While these factors are important, they don't tell the whole story. Evolutionary Criminology: Towards a Comprehensive Explanation of Crime explores how evolutionary biology adds to our understanding of why crime is committed, by whom, and our response to norm violations. This understanding is important both for a better understanding of

The Oxford Handbook of Evolution, Biology, and Society

The Oxford Handbook of Evolution, Biology, and Society
  • Author : Rosemary Hopcroft,Rosemary L. Hopcroft
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 13 June 2021
GET THIS BOOKThe Oxford Handbook of Evolution, Biology, and Society

Evolution, biology, and society is a catch-all phrase encompassing any scholarly work that utilizes evolutionary theory and/or biological or behavioral genetic methods in the study of the human social group, and The Oxford Handbook of Evolution, Biology, and Society contains an much needed overview of research in the area by sociologists and other social scientists. The examined topics cover a wide variety of issues, including the origins of social solidarity; religious beliefs; sex differences; gender inequality; determinants of human

Evolution and Crime

Evolution and Crime
  • Author : Jason Roach,Ken Pease
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 11 April 2013
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Human physique and behaviour has been shaped by the pressures of natural selection. This is received wisdom in all scientifically informed circles. Currently, the topic of crime is rarely touched upon in textbooks on evolution and the topic of evolution rarely even mentioned in criminology textbooks. This book for the first time explores how an evolution informed criminology has clear implications for enhancing our understanding of the criminal law, crime and criminal behaviour. This book is directed more towards students

The Oxford Handbook of Gender, Sex, and Crime

The Oxford Handbook of Gender, Sex, and Crime
  • Author : Rosemary Gartner,Bill McCarthy
  • Publisher : Oxford Handbooks
  • Release : 13 June 2021
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The editors, Rosemary Gartner and Bill McCarthy, have assembled a diverse cast of criminologists, historians, legal scholars, psychologists, and sociologists from a number of countries to discuss key concepts and debates central to the field. The Handbook includes examinations of the historical and contemporary patterns of women's and men's involvement in crime; as well as biological, psychological, and social science perspectives on gender, sex, and criminal activity. Several essays discuss the ways in which sex and gender influence legal and

The Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment

The Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment
  • Author : Wesley G. Jennings
  • Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
  • Release : 19 January 2016
GET THIS BOOKThe Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment

The Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment provides the most comprehensive reference for a vast number of topics relevant to crime and punishment with a unique focus on the multi/interdisciplinary and international aspects of these topics and historical perspectives on crime and punishment around the world. Named as one of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles of 2016 Comprising nearly 300 entries, this invaluable reference resource serves as the most up-to-date and wide-ranging resource on crime and punishment Offers a global perspective from an

Evolutionary Psychology and Terrorism

Evolutionary Psychology and Terrorism
  • Author : Max Taylor,Jason Roach,Ken Pease
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 27 August 2015
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This book explores the evolutionary context of terrorism and political violence. While evolutionary thinking has come to permeate both biological and social-science theorising, it has not yet been applied systematically to the areas of terrorism and political violence. This volume seeks to do this for the first time. It presents a collection of essays on evolutionary psychology and terrorism, which encourage the reader to approach terrorism from a non-traditional perspective, by developing new approaches to understanding it and those who

The Criminal Brain, Second Edition

The Criminal Brain, Second Edition
  • Author : Nicole Rafter,Chad Posick,Michael Rocque
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Release : 30 August 2016
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A lively, up-to-date overview of the newest research in biosocial criminology What is the relationship between criminality and biology? Nineteenth-century phrenologists insisted that criminality was innate, inherent in the offender’s brain matter. While they were eventually repudiated as pseudo-scientists, today the pendulum has swung back. Both criminologists and biologists have begun to speak of a tantalizing but disturbing possibility: that criminality may be inherited as a set of genetic deficits that place one at risk to commit theft, violence,

Biosocial Theories of Crime

Biosocial Theories of Crime
  • Author : KevinM. Beaver
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 05 July 2017
GET THIS BOOKBiosocial Theories of Crime

Biosocial criminology is an emerging perspective that highlights the interdependence between genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of antisocial behaviors. However, given that biosocial criminology has only recently gained traction among criminologists, there has not been any attempt to compile some of the "classic" articles on this topic. Beaver and Walsh's edited volume addresses this gap in the literature by identifying some of the most influential biosocial criminological articles and including them in a single resource. The articles covered

The Criminal Brain

The Criminal Brain
  • Author : Nicole Rafter
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Release : 01 October 2008
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What is the relationship between criminality and biology? Nineteenth-century phrenologists insisted that criminality was innate, a trait inherent in the offender’s brain matter. While they were eventually repudiated as pseudo-scientists and self-deluded charlatans, today the pendulum has swung back. Both criminologists and biologists have begun to speak of a tantalizing but disturbing possibility: that criminality may be inherited as a set of genetic deficits that place one at risk for theft, violence, and sexual deviance. If that is so,

Building a Black Criminology, Volume 24

Building a Black Criminology, Volume 24
  • Author : James D. Unnever,Shaun L. Gabbidon,Cecilia Chouhy
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 26 October 2018
GET THIS BOOKBuilding a Black Criminology, Volume 24

In light of the Black Lives Matter movement and protests in many cities, race plays an ever more salient role in crime and justice. Within theoretical criminology, however, race has oddly remained on the periphery. It is often introduced as a control variable in tests of theories and is rarely incorporated as a central construct in mainstream paradigms (e.g., control, social learning, and strain theories). When race is discussed, the standard approach is to embrace the racial invariance thesis,

The Origins of Criminology

The Origins of Criminology
  • Author : Nicole H. Rafter
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 02 June 2009
GET THIS BOOKThe Origins of Criminology

The Origins of Criminology: A Reader is a collection of nineteenth-century texts from the key originators of the practice of criminology – selected, introduced, and with commentaries by the leading scholar in this area, Nicole Rafter. This book presents criminology as a unique field of study that took root in a context in which urbanization, immigration, and industrialization changed the class structure of Western nations. As relatively homogenous communities became more sharply divided and aware of a bottom-most group, the 'dangerous

Missing the Revolution

Missing the Revolution
  • Author : Jerome H. Barkow
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 01 December 2005
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In The Adapted Mind, Jerome Barkow, along with Leda Cosmides and John Tooby, set out to redefine evolutionary psychology for the social sciences and to create a new agenda for the next generation of social scientists. While biologically oriented psychologists quickly accepted the work, social scientists in psychology and researchers in anthropology and sociology, who deal with the same questions of human behavior, were more resistant. Missing the Revolution is an invitation to researchers from these disciplines who, in Barkow's

Psychological Criminology

Psychological Criminology
  • Author : Richard Wortley
  • Publisher : Taylor & Francis
  • Release : 12 April 2011
GET THIS BOOKPsychological Criminology

Psychological Criminology addresses the question: what is it about individuals and their experiences that cause them to commit crime and/or to become criminal? This book provides a comprehensive coverage of psychological theories of crime and criminality, exploring theories focusing on factors present at birth (human nature, heredity); theories that focus on factors that influence the offender over the lifespan (learning, development); and theories focusing on factors present at the crime scene. It emphasizes the connections among the different approaches,

Evolutionary Psychology

Evolutionary Psychology
  • Author : Source Wikipedia
  • Publisher : University-Press.org
  • Release : 01 September 2013
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 114. Chapters: Adaptive behaviors, Agent detection, A Natural History of Rape, Biophilia hypothesis, Biosocial criminology, Center for Evolutionary Psychology, Cinderella effect, Cognitive description, Cognitive module, Concealed ovulation, Criticism of evolutionary psychology, Darwinian literary studies, Dear enemy effect, Dunbar's number, Error management theory, Evolutionary aesthetics, Evolutionary approaches to depression, Evolutionary developmental psychology, Evolutionary developmental psychopathology, Evolutionary educational psychology, Evolutionary ethics, Evolutionary