Facing East from Indian Country

In the beginning, North America was Indian country. But only in the beginning. After the opening act of the great national drama, Native Americans yielded to the westward rush of European settlers. Or so the story usually goes. Yet, for three centuries after Columbus, Native people controlled most of eastern North America and profoundly shaped its destiny. In Facing East from Indian Country, Daniel K. Richter keeps Native people center-stage throughout the story of the origins of the United States. Viewed from Indian country, the sixteenth century was an era in which Native people discovered Europeans and struggled to make sense of a new world. Well into the seventeenth century, the most profound challenges to Indian life came less from the arrival of a relative handful of European colonists than from the biological, economic, and environmental forces the newcomers unleashed. Drawing upon their own traditions, Indian communities reinvented themselves and carved out a place in a world dominated by transatlantic European empires. In 1776, however, when some of Britain's colonists rebelled against that imperial world, they overturned the system that had made Euro-American and Native coexistence possible. Eastern North America only ceased to be an Indian country because the revolutionaries denied the continent's first peoples a place in the nation they were creating. In rediscovering early America as Indian country, Richter employs the historian's craft to challenge cherished assumptions about times and places we thought we knew well, revealing Native American experiences at the core of the nation's birth and identity.

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  • Author : Dr Daniel K Richter
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Pages : 336 pages
  • ISBN : 9780674042728
  • Rating : 4/5 from 1 reviews
CLICK HERE TO GET THIS BOOKFacing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
  • Author : Dr Daniel K Richter
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release : 01 June 2009
GET THIS BOOKFacing East from Indian Country

In the beginning, North America was Indian country. But only in the beginning. After the opening act of the great national drama, Native Americans yielded to the westward rush of European settlers. Or so the story usually goes. Yet, for three centuries after Columbus, Native people controlled most of eastern North America and profoundly shaped its destiny. In Facing East from Indian Country, Daniel K. Richter keeps Native people center-stage throughout the story of the origins of the United States.

Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 05 June 2008
GET THIS BOOKFacing East from Indian Country

Discusses the myth of European control over the Native Americans in the sixteenth century, and claims that Native Americans controlled the majority of eastern North America well after Columbus' arrival, having only to adjust to their presence.

Facing East from Indian Country

Facing East from Indian Country
  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 06 March 2021
GET THIS BOOKFacing East from Indian Country

Discusses the myth of European control over the Native Americans in the sixteenth century, and claims that Native Americans controlled the majority of eastern North America well after Columbus' arrival, having only to adjust to their presence.

The Ordeal of the Longhouse

The Ordeal of the Longhouse
  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : UNC Press Books
  • Release : 01 May 2011
GET THIS BOOKThe Ordeal of the Longhouse

Richter examines a wide range of primary documents to survey the responses of the peoples of the Iroquois League--the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Senecas, and Tuscaroras--to the challenges of the European colonialization of North America. He demonstrates that by the early eighteenth century a series of creative adaptations in politics and diplomacy allowed the peoples of the Longhouse to preserve their cultural autonomy in a land now dominated by foreign powers.

Before the Revolution

Before the Revolution
  • Author : Daniel K. Richter
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release : 25 August 2011
GET THIS BOOKBefore the Revolution

In this epic synthesis, Richter reveals a new America. Surveying many centuries prior to the American Revolution, we discover the tumultuous encounters between the peoples of North America, Africa, and Europe and see how the present is the accumulation of the ancient layers of the past.

How the Indians Lost Their Land

How the Indians Lost Their Land
  • Author : Stuart BANNER
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release : 30 June 2009
GET THIS BOOKHow the Indians Lost Their Land

Between the early seventeenth century and the early twentieth, nearly all the land in the United States was transferred from American Indians to whites. How did Indians actually lose their land? Stuart Banner argues that neither simple coercion nor simple consent reflects the complicated legal history of land transfers. Instead, time, place, and the balance of power between Indians and settlers decided the outcome of land struggles.

This Indian Country

This Indian Country
  • Author : Frederick Hoxie
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release : 25 October 2012
GET THIS BOOKThis Indian Country

Frederick E. Hoxie, one of our most prominent and celebrated academic historians of Native American history, has for years asked his undergraduate students at the beginning of each semester to write down the names of three American Indians. Almost without exception, year after year, the names are Geronimo, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. The general conclusion is inescapable: Most Americans instinctively view Indians as people of the past who occupy a position outside the central narrative of American history. These

Native America and the Question of Genocide

Native America and the Question of Genocide
  • Author : Alex Alvarez
  • Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
  • Release : 14 March 2014
GET THIS BOOKNative America and the Question of Genocide

Did Native Americans suffer genocide? This controversial question lies at the heart of Native America and the Question of Genocide. After reviewing the various meanings of the word “genocide,” author Alex Alvarez examines a range of well-known examples, such as the Sand Creek Massacre and the Long Walk of the Navajo, to determine where genocide occurred and where it did not. The book explores the destructive beliefs of the European settlers and then looks at topics including disease, war, and

New Worlds for All

New Worlds for All
  • Author : Colin G. Calloway
  • Publisher : JHU Press
  • Release : 18 February 1998
GET THIS BOOKNew Worlds for All

Although many Americans consider the establishment of the colonies as the birth of this country, in fact Early America already existed long before the arrival of the Europeans. From coast to coast, Native Americans had created enduring cultures, and the subsequent European invasion remade much of the existing land and culture. In New Worlds for All, Colin Calloway explores the unique and vibrant new cultures that Indians and Europeans forged together in early America. The journey toward this hybrid society

Skull Wars

Skull Wars
  • Author : David Hurst Thomas
  • Publisher : Basic Books
  • Release : 05 April 2001
GET THIS BOOKSkull Wars

The 1996 discovery, near Kennewick, Washington, of a 9,000-year-old Caucasoid skeleton brought more to the surface than bones. The explosive controversy and resulting lawsuit also raised a far more fundamental question: Who owns history? Many Indians see archeologists as desecrators of tribal rites and traditions; archeologists see their livelihoods and science threatened by the 1990 Federal reparation law, which gives tribes control over remains in their traditional territories. In this new work, Thomas charts the riveting story of this lawsuit, the archeologists'

American Indian History

American Indian History
  • Author : Camilla Townsend
  • Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
  • Release : 20 April 2009
GET THIS BOOKAmerican Indian History

This Reader from the Uncovering the Past series provides a comprehensive introduction to American Indianhistory. Over 60 primary documents allow the voices of natives toilluminate the American past Includes samples of native languages just above the fulltranslations of particular texts Provides comprehensive introductions and headnotes, as well asimages, an extensive bibliography, and suggestions for furtherresearch Includes such texts as a decoded Maya inscription, letterswritten during the French and Indian War on the distribution ofsmall pox blankets, and a diatribe by General

"Farewell, My Nation"

  • Author : Philip Weeks
  • Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
  • Release : 16 February 2016
GET THIS BOOK"Farewell, My Nation"

The fully updated third edition of "Farewell, My Nation" considers the complex and often tragic relationships between American Indians, white Americans, and the U.S. government during the nineteenth century, as the government tried to find ways to deal with social and political questions about how to treat America's indigenous population. Updated to include new scholarship that has appeared since the publication of the second edition as well as additional primary source material Examines the cultural and material impact of

Masters of Empire

Masters of Empire
  • Author : Michael McDonnell
  • Publisher : Hill and Wang
  • Release : 08 December 2015
GET THIS BOOKMasters of Empire

A radical reinterpretation of early American history from a native point of view In Masters of Empire, the historian Michael McDonnell reveals the pivotal role played by the native peoples of the Great Lakes in the history of North America. Though less well known than the Iroquois or Sioux, the Anishinaabeg who lived along Lakes Michigan and Huron were equally influential. McDonnell charts their story, and argues that the Anishinaabeg have been relegated to the edges of history for too