Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Grain legumes, including common-bean, chickpea, pigeonpea, pea, cowpea, lentil and others, form important constituents of global diets, both vegetarian and non-vegetarian. Despite this significant role, global production has increased only marginally in the past 50 years. The slow production growth, along with a rising human population and improved buying capacity has substantially reduced the per capita availability of food legumes. Changes in environmental climate have also had significant impact on production, creating a need to identify stable donors among genetic resources for environmentally robust genes and designing crops resilient to climate change. Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement is the first book to bring together the latest resources in plant genetics and genomics to facilitate the identification of specific germplasm, trait mapping and allele mining to more effectively develop biotic and abiotic-stress-resistant grains. This book will be an invaluable resource for researchers, crop biologists and students working with crop development. Explores origin, distribution and diversity of grain legumes Presents information on germplasm collection, evaluation and maintenance Offers insight into pre-breeding/germplasm enhancement efforts Integrates genomic and genetic resources in crop improvement Internationally contributed work

Produk Detail:

  • Author : Mohar Singh
  • Publisher : Newnes
  • Pages : 322 pages
  • ISBN : 0123984947
  • Rating : 4/5 from 21 reviews
CLICK HERE TO GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Mohar Singh,Hari D. Upadhyaya,I. S. Bisht
  • Publisher : Newnes
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Grain legumes, including common-bean, chickpea, pigeonpea, pea, cowpea, lentil and others, form important constituents of global diets, both vegetarian and non-vegetarian. Despite this significant role, global production has increased only marginally in the past 50 years. The slow production growth, along with a rising human population and improved buying capacity has substantially reduced the per capita availability of food legumes. Changes in environmental climate have also had significant impact on production, creating a need to identify stable donors among genetic resources

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Clarice Coyne,Rebecca McGee
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Lentil (Lens culinaris spp. culinaris) has a long history associated with the early civilizations 11,000 BP in southwestern Asia. The progenitor taxon is Lens culinaris spp. orientalis. The primary source of germplasm for lentil crop improvement is from the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Aleppo, Syria, and other ex situ national collections. Typical of many crop species, lentil experienced a genetic bottleneck during domestication. Fortunately, many biotic and abiotic stress resistances have been identified and accessed

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Shiv Kumar,Priyanka Gupta,Surendra Barpete,A. Sarker,Ahmed Amri,P.N. Mathur,Michael Baum
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) is an important cool-season legume species with wide genetic diversity spread across the continents. With the climate change scenario it has emerged as a viable crop option for fragile agro-ecosystems, where successful cultivation of major crop species is apparently not difficult. However, grass pea seeds are known to have a neurotoxin known as β-N-oxalyl-l-α, β-diaminopropionic acid (β-ODAP). Its overconsumption as a staple food in an unbalanced diet for an extended period of 3–4 months can cause

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Petr Smýkal,Clarice Coyne,Robert Redden,Nigel Maxted
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Pea is an important temperate region pulse, with feed, fodder and vegetable uses. It originated and was domesticated in Middle East and Mediterranean regions, and formed important dietary components of early civilizations. Although Pisum is a very small genus with two or three species, it is diverse and structured, reflecting taxonomy, ecogeography and breeding gene pools. This diversity has been preserved in collections totalling about 90,000 accessions. Core collections have been formed, facilitating phenotypic and agronomic evaluations. However, only 3% of ex

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Maalouf Fouad,Nawar Mohammed,Hamwieh Aladdin,Amri Ahmed,Zong Xuxiao,Bao Shiying,Yang Tao
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Faba bean was first domesticated in the Near East about 10,000 BC. It is now grown worldwide on 2.56 million ha with a yield of 4.56 million tons. The traditional landraces are affected by the different biotic and abiotic stresses. Replacement of these low-yielding landraces by improved cultivars has resulted in a yield increase of 15.4kg/ha/year over the last 40 years. A reduction of the planted area from 7.5 million ha in 1961 to 2.56 million ha in 2010 and cultivation of improved cultivars are the

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Shivali Sharma,Hari D. Upadhyaya,Manish Roorkiwal,Rajeev K. Varshney,C.L.Laxmipathi Gowda
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Chickpea is an important protein-rich crop with considerable diversity present among 44 annual Cicer species. A large collection of chickpea germplasm including wild Cicer species has been conserved in different gene banks globally. However, the effective and efficient utilization of these resources is required to develop new cultivars with a broad genetic base. Using core and mini-core collections, chickpea researchers have identified diverse germplasm possessing various beneficial traits that are now being used in chickpea breeding. Further, for chickpea improvement, the

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Lucia Lioi,Angela R. Piergiovanni
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

In this chapter, we lead the reader through several topics related to common bean germplasm, including crop dissemination across the Old World, landraces developed by farmers, characterization and safeguard of germplasm. These topics are attracting a great deal of attention, especially in recent years, when the international community has become increasingly aware of the relevance of safeguarding plant genetic resources. Early studies were mainly aimed at performing exploratory analyses of agro-morphological traits, with the goal of improving yield and pest

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : R.K. Chahota,T.R. Sharma,S.K. Sharma,Naresh Kumar,J.C. Rana
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Horse gram is a pulse and fodder crop native to Southeast Asia and tropical Africa. India is the only country cultivating horse gram on a large acreage, where it is being used for human food. It is a versatile crop and can be grown from near sea level to 1800m. It is a drought-tolerant crop plant and can be grown successfully with low rainfall. Global efforts to conserve the horse gram germplasm are lacking, as the crop does not attract

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Ousmane Boukar,Ranjana Bhattacharjee,Christian Fatokun,P. Lava Kumar,Badara Gueye
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), an indigenous legume to sub-Saharan Africa, is mainly grown in the dry savanna areas as an intercrop with millets, sorghum, groundnut and maize. Cowpea grains rich in protein are consumed in different forms in several parts of the tropics. The average grain yield of cowpea in West Africa is approximately 492kg/ha, which is much lower than its potential yields. This low productivity is due to a host of diseases, insects, pests, parasitic weeds, drought, poor soils

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : H. Thomas Stalker
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

The genus Arachis has 80 diploid, aneuploid and tetraploid species that have been separated into nine sections. The cultivated peanut Arachis hypogaea L. is an allotetraploid that originated from the two diploids in section Arachis, and there has been no apparent introgression from related wild species since its origin. Systematic acquisition of wild and cultivated species began in the 1960s and has resulted in large collections of both Arachis species and A. hypogaea. However, additional germplasm is needed to fill in

Broadening the Genetic Base of Grain Legumes

Broadening the Genetic Base of Grain Legumes
  • Author : Mohar Singh,Ishwari Singh Bisht,Manoranjan Dutta
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Release : 28 October 2014
GET THIS BOOKBroadening the Genetic Base of Grain Legumes

Grain legumes play significant and diverse role in the farming systems and provide nutrition security to the largely vegetarian and relatively poorer people around the world. These are ideal crops for achieving three simultaneous developmental goals viz. reducing poverty, improving human health and nutrition and enhancing ecosystem resilience. Globally, grain legumes are the second most important crop group next only to cereals but a large proportion of area of it is under rainfed-low input systems as compared to cereals contributing

Lentils

Lentils
  • Author : Mohar Singh
  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Release : 10 August 2018
GET THIS BOOKLentils

Lentils: Potential Resources for Enhancing Genetic Gains describes the evolutionary aspects and agronomic potential of this important pulse with emphasis placed on wide hybridization, including molecular aspects and future breeding strategies. The existing variability among cultivated germplasm has been exploited to reach a desirable level of productivity. However, to attain further breakthroughs in increasing yield and improving stability in future cultivars, new sources of genes/alleles need to be identified and incorporated into cultivated varieties. This book provides specific use

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Mohar Singh,Hari D. Upadhyaya,Ishwari Singh Bisht
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Grain legumes mainly consisting of common bean, pea, chickpea, faba bean, cowpea, lentil, pigeon pea, peanut, Asian Vigna species, grass pea and horsegram are under cultivation in a considerable area worldwide. With their higher protein content and symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in root nodules enabling them to fix their own nitrogen, reducing the fertilizer use in agriculture has become very important for the production systems. For most of these important grain legumes, a large number of germplasm accessions were characterized and

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Ishwari Singh Bisht,Mohar Singh
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

The Asian Vigna in the subgenus Ceratotropis, with several recognized species distributed across Asia, constitute an economically important group of cultivated and wild species for which a rich diversity occurs in India and other parts of Asia. Taxonomically, cultigen and conspecific wild forms are recognized in all major cultivated Asiatic pulses, mung bean (V. radiata), urd bean (V. mungo), rice bean (V. umbellata) and azuki bean (V. angularis) except for moth bean (V. aconitifolia), which has retained a wild-type morphology.

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Genetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement
  • Author : Hari D. Upadhyaya,Shivali Sharma,K.N. Reddy,Rachit Saxena,Rajeev K. Varshney,C.L. Laxmipathi Gowda
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 18 July 2013
GET THIS BOOKGenetic and Genomic Resources of Grain Legume Improvement

Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh) is an important grain legume crop grown in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Though pigeon pea has a narrow genetic base, vast genetic resources are available for its genetic improvement. Evaluation of small subsets, such as core (10% of the whole collection) and mini-core collections (about 1% of the entire collection), has resulted in the identification of promising diverse sources for agronomic and nutrition-related traits as well as resistance/tolerance to important biotic/abiotic