How to Lie with Maps

Originally published to wide acclaim, this lively, cleverly illustrated essay on the use and abuse of maps teaches us how to evaluate maps critically and promotes a healthy skepticism about these easy-to-manipulate models of reality. Monmonier shows that, despite their immense value, maps lie. In fact, they must. The second edition is updated with the addition of two new chapters, 10 color plates, and a new foreword by renowned geographer H. J. de Blij. One new chapter examines the role of national interest and cultural values in national mapping organizations, including the United States Geological Survey, while the other explores the new breed of multimedia, computer-based maps. To show how maps distort, Monmonier introduces basic principles of mapmaking, gives entertaining examples of the misuse of maps in situations from zoning disputes to census reports, and covers all the typical kinds of distortions from deliberate oversimplifications to the misleading use of color. "Professor Monmonier himself knows how to gain our attention; it is not in fact the lies in maps but their truth, if always approximate and incomplete, that he wants us to admire and use, even to draw for ourselves on the facile screen. His is an artful and funny book, which like any good map, packs plenty in little space."—Scientific American "A useful guide to a subject most people probably take too much for granted. It shows how map makers translate abstract data into eye-catching cartograms, as they are called. It combats cartographic illiteracy. It fights cartophobia. It may even teach you to find your way. For that alone, it seems worthwhile."—Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times ". . . witty examination of how and why maps lie. [The book] conveys an important message about how statistics of any kind can be manipulated. But it also communicates much of the challenge, aesthetic appeal, and sheer fun of maps. Even those who hated geography in grammar school might well find a new enthusiasm for the subject after reading Monmonier's lively and surprising book."—Wilson Library Bulletin "A reading of this book will leave you much better defended against cheap atlases, shoddy journalism, unscrupulous advertisers, predatory special-interest groups, and others who may use or abuse maps at your expense."—John Van Pelt, Christian Science Monitor "Monmonier meets his goal admirably. . . . [His] book should be put on every map user's 'must read' list. It is informative and readable . . . a big step forward in helping us to understand how maps can mislead their readers."—Jeffrey S. Murray, Canadian Geographic

Produk Detail:

  • Author : Mark Monmonier
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Pages : 221 pages
  • ISBN : 9780226534213
  • Rating : 4/5 from 4 reviews
CLICK HERE TO GET THIS BOOKHow to Lie with Maps

How to Lie with Maps

How to Lie with Maps
  • Author : Mark Monmonier
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 01 May 1996
GET THIS BOOKHow to Lie with Maps

Originally published to wide acclaim, this lively, cleverly illustrated essay on the use and abuse of maps teaches us how to evaluate maps critically and promotes a healthy skepticism about these easy-to-manipulate models of reality. Monmonier shows that, despite their immense value, maps lie. In fact, they must. The second edition is updated with the addition of two new chapters, 10 color plates, and a new foreword by renowned geographer H. J. de Blij. One new chapter examines the role of

How to Lie with Maps

How to Lie with Maps
  • Author : Mark Monmonier
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 10 December 2014
GET THIS BOOKHow to Lie with Maps

Originally published to wide acclaim, this lively, cleverly illustrated essay on the use and abuse of maps teaches us how to evaluate maps critically and promotes a healthy skepticism about these easy-to-manipulate models of reality. Monmonier shows that, despite their immense value, maps lie. In fact, they must. The second edition is updated with the addition of two new chapters, 10 color plates, and a new foreword by renowned geographer H. J. de Blij. One new chapter examines the role of

How to Lie with Maps, Third Edition

How to Lie with Maps, Third Edition
  • Author : Mark Monmonier
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 13 April 2018
GET THIS BOOKHow to Lie with Maps, Third Edition

An instant classic when first published in 1991, How to Lie with Maps revealed how the choices mapmakers make—consciously or unconsciously—mean that every map inevitably presents only one of many possible stories about the places it depicts. The principles Mark Monmonier outlined back then remain true today, despite significant technological changes in the making and use of maps. The introduction and spread of digital maps and mapping software, however, have added new wrinkles to the ever-evolving landscape of modern

How to Lie with Statistics

How to Lie with Statistics
  • Author : Darrell Huff
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Release : 07 December 2010
GET THIS BOOKHow to Lie with Statistics

If you want to outsmart a crook, learn his tricks—Darrell Huff explains exactly how in the classic How to Lie with Statistics. From distorted graphs and biased samples to misleading averages, there are countless statistical dodges that lend cover to anyone with an ax to grind or a product to sell. With abundant examples and illustrations, Darrell Huff’s lively and engaging primer clarifies the basic principles of statistics and explains how they’re used to present information in

Mapping It Out

Mapping It Out
  • Author : Mark Monmonier
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 27 July 2015
GET THIS BOOKMapping It Out

Writers know only too well how long it can take—and how awkward it can be—to describe spatial relationships with words alone. And while a map might not always be worth a thousand words, a good one can help writers communicate an argument or explanation clearly, succinctly, and effectively. In his acclaimed How to Lie with Maps, Mark Monmonier showed how maps can distort facts. In Mapping it Out: Expository Cartography for the Humanities and Social Sciences, he shows

No Dig, No Fly, No Go

No Dig, No Fly, No Go
  • Author : Mark Monmonier
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 15 May 2010
GET THIS BOOKNo Dig, No Fly, No Go

Some maps help us find our way; others restrict where we go and what we do. These maps control behavior, regulating activities from flying to fishing, prohibiting students from one part of town from being schooled on the other, and banishing certain individuals and industries to the periphery. This restrictive cartography has boomed in recent decades as governments seek regulate activities as diverse as hiking, building a residence, opening a store, locating a chemical plant, or painting your house anything

Rhumb Lines and Map Wars

Rhumb Lines and Map Wars
  • Author : Mark Monmonier
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 15 November 2010
GET THIS BOOKRhumb Lines and Map Wars

In Rhumb Lines and Map Wars, Mark Monmonier offers an insightful, richly illustrated account of the controversies surrounding Flemish cartographer Gerard Mercator's legacy. He takes us back to 1569, when Mercator announced a clever method of portraying the earth on a flat surface, creating the first projection to take into account the earth's roundness. As Monmonier shows, mariners benefited most from Mercator's projection, which allowed for easy navigation of the high seas with rhumb lines—clear-cut routes with a constant compass

Exploring the U.S. Census

Exploring the U.S. Census
  • Author : Frank Donnelly
  • Publisher : SAGE Publications
  • Release : 07 October 2019
GET THIS BOOKExploring the U.S. Census

The United States census provides researchers, students, and the public with some of the richest and broadest information available about the American people. Exploring the U.S. Census by Frank Donnelly gives social science students and researchers alike the tools to understand, extract, process, and analyze data from the decennial census, the American Community Survey, and other data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau. More than just a data collection exercise performed every ten years, the census is a

A History of Canada in Ten Maps

A History of Canada in Ten Maps
  • Author : Adam Shoalts
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release : 10 October 2017
GET THIS BOOKA History of Canada in Ten Maps

Winner of the 2018 Louise de Kiriline Lawrence Award for Nonfiction Longlisted for the 2018 RBC Taylor Prize Shortlisted for the 2018 Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction The sweeping, epic story of the mysterious land that came to be called “Canada” like it’s never been told before. Every map tells a story. And every map has a purpose--it invites us to go somewhere we've never been. It’s an account of what we know, but also a trace of what we

Drawing the Line

Drawing the Line
  • Author : Mark S. Monmonier
  • Publisher : Mark Monmonier
  • Release : 31 July 1995
GET THIS BOOKDrawing the Line

Argues that maps can be manipulated to distort the truth, and shows how they have been used for propaganda in international affairs, political districting, and finding toxic dump sites

From Squaw Tit to Whorehouse Meadow

From Squaw Tit to Whorehouse Meadow
  • Author : Mark Monmonier
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 15 September 2008
GET THIS BOOKFrom Squaw Tit to Whorehouse Meadow

Brassiere Hills, Alaska. Mollys Nipple, Utah. Outhouse Draw, Nevada. In the early twentieth century, it was common for towns and geographical features to have salacious, bawdy, and even derogatory names. In the age before political correctness, mapmakers readily accepted any local preference for place names, prizing accurate representation over standards of decorum. Thus, summits such as Squaw Tit—which towered above valleys in Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, and California—found their way into the cartographic annals. Later, when sanctions prohibited

How Charts Lie: Getting Smarter about Visual Information

How Charts Lie: Getting Smarter about Visual Information
  • Author : Alberto Cairo
  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Release : 15 October 2019
GET THIS BOOKHow Charts Lie: Getting Smarter about Visual Information

A leading data visualization expert explores the negative—and positive—influences that charts have on our perception of truth. We’ve all heard that a picture is worth a thousand words, but what if we don’t understand what we’re looking at? Social media has made charts, infographics, and diagrams ubiquitous—and easier to share than ever. We associate charts with science and reason; the flashy visuals are both appealing and persuasive. Pie charts, maps, bar and line graphs,

Making Maps

Making Maps
  • Author : John Krygier,Denis Wood
  • Publisher : Guilford Press
  • Release : 23 March 2011
GET THIS BOOKMaking Maps

This volume is a concise guide to creating maps using GIS (a geographic information system). In the simplest terms, GIS is the merging of cartography, statistical analysis and database technology. Featuring over 300 maps and other figures, including instructive examples of both good and poor design choices, the book covers everything from locating and processing data to making decisions about layout, map symbols, color, and type.

The Red Atlas

The Red Atlas
  • Author : John Davies,Alexander J. Kent
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 17 October 2017
GET THIS BOOKThe Red Atlas

Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, its legacy and the accompanying Russian-American tension continues to loom large. Russia’s access to detailed information on the United States and its allies may not seem so shocking in this day of data clouds and leaks, but long before we had satellite imagery of any neighborhood at a finger’s reach, the amount the Soviet government knew about your family’s city, street, and even your home would astonish