Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Introduction to American Deaf Culture provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Deaf in contemporary hearing society. The book offers an overview of Deaf art, literature, history, and humor, and touches on political, social and cultural themes.

Produk Detail:

  • Author : Thomas K. Holcomb
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Pages : 370 pages
  • ISBN : 0199777543
  • Rating : 5/5 from 1 reviews
CLICK HERE TO GET THIS BOOKIntroduction to American Deaf Culture

Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Introduction to American Deaf Culture
  • Author : Thomas K. Holcomb
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 21 December 2012
GET THIS BOOKIntroduction to American Deaf Culture

Introduction to American Deaf Culture is the only comprehensive textbook that provides a broad, yet in-depth, exploration of how Deaf people are best understood from a cultural perspective, with coverage of topics such as how culture is defined, how the concept of culture can be applied to the Deaf experience, and how Deaf culture has evolved over the years. Among the issues included are an analysis of various segments of the Deaf community, Deaf cultural norms, the tension between the

Deaf Culture

Deaf Culture
  • Author : Irene W. Leigh,Jean F. Andrews,Raychelle L. Harris,Topher González Ávila
  • Publisher : Plural Publishing
  • Release : 12 November 2020
GET THIS BOOKDeaf Culture

A contemporary and vibrant Deaf culture is found within Deaf communities, including Deaf Persons of Color and those who are DeafDisabled and DeafBlind. Taking a more people-centered view, the second edition of Deaf Culture: Exploring Deaf Communities in the United States critically examines how Deaf culture fits into education, psychology, cultural studies, technology, and the arts. With the acknowledgment of signed languages all over the world as bona fide languages, the perception of Deaf people has evolved into the recognition

Signs of Resistance

Signs of Resistance
  • Author : Susan Burch
  • Publisher : NYU Press
  • Release : 01 November 2002
GET THIS BOOKSigns of Resistance

Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2003 During the nineteenth century, American schools for deaf education regarded sign language as the "natural language" of Deaf people, using it as the principal mode of instruction and communication. These schools inadvertently became the seedbeds of an emerging Deaf community and culture. But beginning in the 1880s, an oralist movement developed that sought to suppress sign language, removing Deaf teachers and requiring deaf people to learn speech and lip reading. Historians have all assumed that in

Inside Deaf Culture

Inside Deaf Culture
  • Author : Carol PADDEN,Tom Humphries,Carol Padden
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release : 30 June 2009
GET THIS BOOKInside Deaf Culture

"Inside Deaf Culture relates deaf people's search for a voice of their own, and their proud self-discovery and self-description as a flourishing culture. Padden and Humphries show how the nineteenth-century schools for the deaf, with their denigration of sign language and their insistence on oralist teaching, shaped the lives of deaf people for generations to come. They describe how deaf culture and art thrived in mid-twentieth century deaf clubs and deaf theatre, and profile controversial contemporary technologies." Cf. Publisher's description.

Deaf Culture Our Way

Deaf Culture Our Way
  • Author : Roy K. Holcomb,Samuel K. Holcomb,Thomas K. Holcomb
  • Publisher : Dawn Sign Press
  • Release : 14 June 1994
GET THIS BOOKDeaf Culture Our Way

This assortment of memorable stories enhances an understanding of how loss of hearing affects the individual.

Understanding Deaf Culture

Understanding Deaf Culture
  • Author : Dr. Paddy Ladd
  • Publisher : Multilingual Matters
  • Release : 18 February 2003
GET THIS BOOKUnderstanding Deaf Culture

This book presents a ‘Traveller’s Guide’ to Deaf Culture, starting from the premise that Deaf cultures have an important contribution to make to other academic disciplines, and human lives in general. Within and outside Deaf communities, there is a need for an account of the new concept of Deaf culture, which enables readers to assess its place alongside work on other minority cultures and multilingual discourses. The book aims to assess the concepts of culture, on their own terms

Deaf Eyes on Interpreting

Deaf Eyes on Interpreting
  • Author : Thomas K Holcomb,David H. Smith
  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 06 January 2020
GET THIS BOOKDeaf Eyes on Interpreting

This text brings Deaf people to the forefront of the discussions about what constitutes quality interpreting services, revealing multiple strategies that will improve an interpreter's performance and enhance access for Deaf consumers.

Deaf in America

Deaf in America
  • Author : Carol A. Padden,Tom Humphries
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press
  • Release : 01 September 1990
GET THIS BOOKDeaf in America

Written by authors who are themselves Deaf, this unique book illuminates the life and culture of Deaf people from the inside, through their everyday talk, their shared myths, their art and performances, and the lessons they teach one another. Padden and Humphries employ the capitalized "Deaf" to refer to deaf people who share a natural language--American Sign Language (ASL)--and a complex culture, historically created and actively transmitted across generations.

Cultural and Language Diversity and the Deaf Experience

Cultural and Language Diversity and the Deaf Experience
  • Author : Ila Parasnis
  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Release : 28 August 1998
GET THIS BOOKCultural and Language Diversity and the Deaf Experience

The perspective that deaf people should be primarily regarded as a cultural and language minority group rather than as individuals with an audiological disability in gathering support among educators, linguists, and researchers involved in the education of deaf people. Minority empowerment movements across America - and American society's increased awareness of its own diversity - have brought a supportive context to the efforts of deaf people to have American Sign Language recognized in planning educational policies and curricula. This book

Reading Between the Signs

Reading Between the Signs
  • Author : Anna Mindess
  • Publisher : Nicholas Brealey
  • Release : 02 October 2014
GET THIS BOOKReading Between the Signs

"A must-read! An enlightening book ... a defining document in the literature of Deaf culture." - Linda Bove, Certified Deaf Interpreter, Actress, Consultant In Reading Between the Signs, Anna Mindess provides a perspective on a culture that is not widely understood-American Deaf culture. With the collaboration of three distinguished Deaf consultants, Mindess explores the implications of cultural differences at the intersection of the Deaf and hearing worlds. Used in sign language interpreter training programs worldwide, Reading Between the Signs is a

The Deaf Way

The Deaf Way
  • Author : Robert C. Johnson,Bruce N. Snider,Dorothy L. Smith
  • Publisher : Gallaudet University Press
  • Release : 14 June 1994
GET THIS BOOKThe Deaf Way

Selected papers from the conference held in Washington DC, July 9-14, 1989.

Deaf Gain

Deaf Gain
  • Author : H-Dirksen L. Bauman,Joseph J. Murray
  • Publisher : U of Minnesota Press
  • Release : 15 October 2014
GET THIS BOOKDeaf Gain

Deaf people are usually regarded by the hearing world as having a lack, as missing a sense. Yet a definition of deaf people based on hearing loss obscures a wealth of ways in which societies have benefited from the significant contributions of deaf people. In this bold intervention into ongoing debates about disability and what it means to be human, experts from a variety of disciplines—neuroscience, linguistics, bioethics, history, cultural studies, education, public policy, art, and architecture—advance the

Forbidden Signs

Forbidden Signs
  • Author : Douglas C. Baynton
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 01 January 1996
GET THIS BOOKForbidden Signs

Forbidden Signs explores American culture from the mid-nineteenth century to 1920 through the lens of one striking episode: the campaign led by Alexander Graham Bell and other prominent Americans to suppress the use of sign language among deaf people. The ensuing debate over sign language invoked such fundamental questions as what distinguished Americans from non-Americans, civilized people from "savages," humans from animals, men from women, the natural from the unnatural, and the normal from the abnormal. An advocate of the return