Stratigraphic reservoir characterization for petroleum geologists geophysicists and engineers

Reservoir characterization as a discipline grew out of the recognition that more oil and gas could be extracted from reservoirs if the geology of the reservoir was understood. Prior to that awakening, reservoir development and production were the realm of the petroleum engineer. In fact, geologists of that time would have felt slighted if asked by corporate management to move from an exciting exploration assignment to a more mundane assignment working with an engineer to improve a reservoir’s performance. Slowly, reservoir characterization came into its own as a quantitative, multidisciplinary endeavor requiring a vast array of skills and knowledge sets. Perhaps the biggest attractor to becoming a reservoir geologist was the advent of fast computing, followed by visualization programs and theaters, all of which allow young geoscientists to practice their computing skills in a highly technical work environment. Also, the discipline grew in parallel with the evolution of data integration and the advent of asset teams in the petroleum industry. Finally, reservoir characterization flourished with the quantum improvements that have occurred in geophysical acquisition and processing techniques and that allow geophysicists to image internal reservoir complexities.

Produk Detail:

  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Pages : 492 pages
  • ISBN : 0080466818
  • Rating : 4/5 from 21 reviews
CLICK HERE TO GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic reservoir characterization for petroleum geologists geophysicists and engineers

Stratigraphic reservoir characterization for petroleum geologists, geophysicists, and engineers

Stratigraphic reservoir characterization for petroleum geologists, geophysicists, and engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release : 03 November 2006
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic reservoir characterization for petroleum geologists, geophysicists, and engineers

Reservoir characterization as a discipline grew out of the recognition that more oil and gas could be extracted from reservoirs if the geology of the reservoir was understood. Prior to that awakening, reservoir development and production were the realm of the petroleum engineer. In fact, geologists of that time would have felt slighted if asked by corporate management to move from an exciting exploration assignment to a more mundane assignment working with an engineer to improve a reservoir’s performance.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Reservoir quality controls the storage, distribution, and flow of fluids within a reservoir. Porosity and permeability are key parameters that are readily measured on rock samples and from well logs; with calibration, porosity can be mapped from 3D seismic surveys. If core material is obtained from a well and porosity and permeability measurements are made on the core, the values can be compared with porosity logs and a permeability log can be developed. Although “flow units” can be determined using

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

There are many tools and techniques for characterizing oil and gas reservoirs. Seismic-reflection techniques include conventional 2D and 3D seismic, 4D time-lapse seismic, multicomponent seismic, crosswell seismic, seismic inversion, and seismic attribute analysis, all designed to enhance stratigraphy/structure detection, resolution, and characterization. These techniques are constantly being improved. Drilling and coring a well provides the “ground truth” for seismic interpretation. Rock formations are directly sampled by cuttings and by core and indirectly characterized with a variety of conventional and

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Fuge Zou
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

In this chapter, the principles of reservoir modeling, workflows and their applications have been summarized. Reservoir modeling is a multi-disciplinary process that requires cooperation from geologists, geophysicists, reservoir engineers, petrophysics and financial individuals, working in a team setting. The best model is one that provides quantitative properties of the reservoir, though this is often difficult to achieve. There are three broad steps in the modeling process. The team needs to first evaluate the data quality, plan the proper modeling workflow,

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

This chapter has summarized the concepts, techniques, and definitions of sequence stratigraphy. As in most subdivisions of geology, sequence stratigraphers have developed their own set of definitions and terminology, which have been outlined here for use in subsequent chapters. It is proposed that sequence stratigraphy form the basis for reservoir characterization, as will be expanded upon in subsequent chapters.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

The focus of this chapter has been on eolian reservoirs, with only a secondary emphasis on description of outcrops. That is because the unique, fine-scale stratification characteristics of eolian deposits that affect their reservoir performance have been very well documented from the reservoirs themselves. Because of the likelihood of stratigraphic compartmentalization and permeability anisotropy resulting from bounding surfaces, it is very important that eolian reservoirs be characterized in detail. In addition to the effects of bounding surfaces, variations in cementation

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Shallow marine environments, from the shoreline to the shelf edge, are complex and result in complex deposits. In turn, complex deposits translate into complex reservoirs. To maximize reservoir performance, it is imperative that we understand the type of shallow marine deposit that makes up the reservoir. That is not an easy task, as is exemplified by the various interpretations that have been assigned to linear sandstones of the U.S. Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway. These sandstones, in both outcrop and

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Certain parts of this chapter have been taken directly from the publication Important geological properties of unconventional resource shales, by Roger M. Slatt, published in the fourth-quarter issue of the Central European Journal of Geosciences (2011). The journal’s permission to reproduce those parts of that paper here is gratefully acknowledged.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

In summary, physical, biogenic, and chemical sedimentary structures are important to many aspects of reservoir characterization and should be included in every characterization, whether the analyst is using cores, borehole-image logs, or an analog outcrop. Sedimentary structures provide important information about the depositional environment of the reservoir rock, and from that information, one can determine the extent and geometry of the reservoir, its trend, and any likely impediments to hydrocarbon production. Porosity and permeability and, in particular, fluid-flow paths are

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

The concept of long periods of time being required for reservoirs to assume their present form is difficult to grasp, particularly for those individuals who track daily oil and gas production from reservoirs. However, the lengthy formative processes for hydrocarbon reservoirs can be understood, and this understanding is important for proper knowledge of why a reservoir is configured the way it is. The geologic time scale is divided into a series of time intervals that are based on significant events

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Globally, deltas often contain major oil and gas reservoirs. The geometry, size, and internal architecture of deltas are functions of many variables related to the delta's mode of formation. A tripartite classification of deltas, into river-, wave-, and tide-dominated deltas, has been a standard for many years. However, even within each of these delta types, the distribution of properties can vary considerably depending on the delta’s depositional history and the relative influence of rivers, waves, and tides. With regard

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

This chapter has summarized the important characteristics of deepwater deposits and reservoirs. These reservoirs are quite complex and variable. An understanding of the different architectural elements and their interrelations is critical to hydrocarbon recovery, because the elements exhibit different external geometries, sizes, spatial orientations, and internal sedimentary and stratigraphic features. Because of these differences, the volume of hydrocarbons and the anticipated recovery efficiency will vary by architectural element (). There are many new and awaiting opportunities for deepwater reservoirs both onshore

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

There are different types of fluvial deposits and reservoirs. The two end-member depositional types are braided-river and fluvial-river deposits. A third type, incised valley fill, can contain either or both of these end members within the confines of the valley. In addition, fluvial deposits near the mouths of the valleys may become reworked by estuarine and tidal processes, which ultimately produce a different set of reservoir properties. The geometry, size, and reservoir characteristics of each fluvial type depend upon transportational,

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
  • Author : Roger M. Slatt
  • Publisher : Newnes
  • Release : 21 November 2013
GET THIS BOOKStratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Reservoir characterization as a discipline grew out of the recognition that more oil and gas could be extracted from reservoirs if the geology of the reservoir was understood. Prior to that awakening, reservoir development and production were the realm of the petroleum engineer. In fact, geologists of that time would have felt slighted if asked by corporate management to move from an exciting exploration assignment to a more mundane assignment working with an engineer to improve a reservoir’s performance.