The Evolution of Hemispheric Specialization in Primates

Hemispheric specialization, and lateralized sensory, cognitive or motor function of the left and right halves of the brain, commonly manifests in humans as right-handedness and left hemisphere specialization of language functions. Historically, this has been considered a hallmark of, and unique to, human evolution. Some theories propose that human right-handedness evolved in the context of language and speech while others that it was a product of the increasing motor demands associated with feeding or tool-use. In the past 20-25 years, there has been a plethora of research in animals on the topic of whether population-level asymmetries in behavioral processes or neuro-anatomical structures exist in animals, notably primates and people have begun to question the historical assumptions that hemispheric specialization is unique to humans. This book brings together various summary chapters on the expression of behavioral and neuro-anatomical asymmetries in primates. Several chapters summarize entire families of primates while others focus on genetic and non-genetic models of handedness in humans and how they can be tested in non-human primates. In addition, it makes explicit links between various theoretical models of the development of handedness in humans with the observed patterns of results in non-human primates. A second emphasis is on comparative studies of handedness in primates. There is now enough data in the literature across different species to present an evolutionary tree for the emergence of handedness (and perhaps other aspects of hemispheric specialization, such as neuro-anatomical asymmetries) and its relation to specific morphological and ecological adaptations in various primate species. * The first treatment of this important topic since 1998 * Examines the tenet that lateralization and handedness is a uniquely human character through evidence from higer and lower primates and with reference to other vertebrates. * Advances our understanding of the occurrence, evolution and significance of lateralization and handedness effects.

Produk Detail:

  • Author : William D. Hopkins
  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Pages : 312 pages
  • ISBN : 9780080557809
  • Rating : 4/5 from 21 reviews
CLICK HERE TO GET THIS BOOKThe Evolution of Hemispheric Specialization in Primates

The Evolution of Hemispheric Specialization in Primates

The Evolution of Hemispheric Specialization in Primates
  • Author : William D. Hopkins
  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release : 18 September 2007
GET THIS BOOKThe Evolution of Hemispheric Specialization in Primates

Hemispheric specialization, and lateralized sensory, cognitive or motor function of the left and right halves of the brain, commonly manifests in humans as right-handedness and left hemisphere specialization of language functions. Historically, this has been considered a hallmark of, and unique to, human evolution. Some theories propose that human right-handedness evolved in the context of language and speech while others that it was a product of the increasing motor demands associated with feeding or tool-use. In the past 20-25 years,

Cerebral Lateralization and Cognition: Evolutionary and Developmental Investigations of Behavioral Biases

Cerebral Lateralization and Cognition: Evolutionary and Developmental Investigations of Behavioral Biases
  • Author : Anonim
  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Release : 07 August 2018
GET THIS BOOKCerebral Lateralization and Cognition: Evolutionary and Developmental Investigations of Behavioral Biases

Cerebral Lateralization and Cognition: Evolutionary and Developmental Investigations of Motor Biases, Volume 238, the latest release in the Progress in Brain Research series, discusses interdisciplinary research on the influence of cerebral lateralization on cognition within an evolutionary framework. Chapters of note in this release include Evolutionary Perspectives: Visual/Motor Biases and Cognition, Manual laterality and cognition through evolution: An archeological perspective, Laterality in insects, Motor asymmetries in fish, amphibians and reptiles, Visual biases and social cognition in animals, Mother and offspring

The Lateralized Brain

The Lateralized Brain
  • Author : Sebastian Ocklenburg,Onur Gunturkun
  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Release : 29 December 2017
GET THIS BOOKThe Lateralized Brain

The Lateralized Brain: The Neuroscience and Evolution of Hemispheric Asymmetries is an up-to-date teaching resource for neuroscience faculty members that teach courses concerning hemispheric asymmetries. The book provides students with all relevant information on the subject, while also giving aspiring researchers in the field an up-to-date overview of relevant, previous work. It is ideal for courses on hemispheric asymmetries, that is, the functional or structural differences between the left and the right hemispheres of the brain, and also highlights how

Evolution of Nervous Systems

Evolution of Nervous Systems
  • Author : Georg F. Striedter,Theodore H. Bullock,Todd M. Preuss,John Rubenstein,Leah A. Krubitzer
  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Release : 15 December 2006
GET THIS BOOKEvolution of Nervous Systems

All biology only makes sense when seen in the light of evolution, and this is especially true for the nervous system. All animals have nervous systems that mediate their behaviors, many of them species specific. Yet, these nervous systems all evolved from the simple nervous system of a common ancestor. To understand these nervous systems, we need to know how they vary and how this variation emerged in evolution. Over 100 distinguished neuroscientists have assembled, for the first time, the current

The Lopsided Ape

The Lopsided Ape
  • Author : Michael C. Corballis
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 10 June 1993
GET THIS BOOKThe Lopsided Ape

How great is the evolutionary distance between humans and apes, and what is it that creates that gulf? Philosophers and scientists have debated the question for centuries, but Michael Corballis finds the mystery revealed in our right hands. For humans are the only primates who are predominantly right handed, a sign of the specialization of the left hemisphere of the brain for language. And that specialization, he tells us, makes a massive distance indeed, as he describes what exactly it

Primate Laterality

Primate Laterality
  • Author : Jeannette P. Ward,William D. Hopkins
  • Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
  • Release : 06 December 2012
GET THIS BOOKPrimate Laterality

This book arrays recent research on the neural and behavioral lateralization of the brain relying heavily on animal modes. The authors employ the comparative method to enhance our understanding of behavior, specifically through hand use and "handedness" by drawing comparisons with studies involving primates. Topics discussed include Patterns of Lateralized Behavior in Prosimians; Behavioral Lateralization in Language-Trained Chimpanzees; Patterns of Handedness: Comparative Study of Nursery School Children and Captive Gorillas; and Rotational Behavior in Children and Adults. It is the

The Two Halves of the Brain

The Two Halves of the Brain
  • Author : Kenneth Hugdahl,Rene Westerhausen
  • Publisher : MIT Press
  • Release : 04 June 2010
GET THIS BOOKThe Two Halves of the Brain

State-of-the-art research on brain asymmetry, explained from molecular to clinical levels. Hemispheric asymmetry is one of the basic aspects of perception and cognitive processing. The different functions of the left and right hemispheres of the brain have been studied with renewed interest in recent years, as scholars explore applications to new areas, new measuring techniques, and new theoretical approaches. This volume provides a comprehensive view of the latest research in brain asymmetry, offering not only recent empirical and clinical findings

In the Light of Evolution

In the Light of Evolution
  • Author : National Academy of Sciences
  • Publisher : National Academies Press
  • Release : 25 January 2013
GET THIS BOOKIn the Light of Evolution

The central goal of the In the Light of Evolution (ILE) series is to promote the evolutionary sciences through state-of-the-art colloquia--in the series of Arthur M. Sackler colloquia sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences--and their published proceedings. Each installment explores evolutionary perspectives on a particular biological topic that is scientifically intriguing but also has special relevance to contemporary societal issues or challenges. This book is the outgrowth of the Arthur M. Sackler Colloquium "Brain and Behavior," which was sponsored

Comparative Vertebrate Cognition

Comparative Vertebrate Cognition
  • Author : Lesley J. Rogers,Gisela Kaplan
  • Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
  • Release : 06 December 2012
GET THIS BOOKComparative Vertebrate Cognition

This book explores afresh the long-standing interest, and emphasis on, the `special' capacities of primates. Some of the recent discoveries of the higher cognitive abilities of other mammals and also birds challenge the concept that primates are special and even the view that the cognitive ability of apes is more advanced than that of nonprimate mammals and birds. It is therefore timely to ask whether primates are, in fact, special and to do so from a broad range of perspectives.